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What’s Cooking in ASU’s Nutritional Instructional Kitchen

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Arizona State University’s School of Nutrition and Health Promotion operates two state-of-the-art, energy-efficient, and environmentally sound instructional kitchens that have become landmarks on the Downtown Phoenix campus. The school, part of the College of Health Solutions, offers twenty-one undergraduate and sixteen graduate majors for students in nutrition, exercise and wellness, kinesiology, health sciences, and medical lab science. Private support feeds their work, giving it the energy and vitality every healthy academic program needs.

[1]
A faculty member for forty years, Professor Linda Vaughan helped transform nutrition education at ASU from a small program in home economics to one of the largest nutrition programs in the United States. To honor Vaughan’s long-time commitment, donors are establishing a scholarship endowment to commemorate her retirement in 2016.

[2]
After Professor Carol Johnston published studies showing that apple-cider vinegar can lower blood glucose in people with type 2 diabetes, the family-owned Bragg Health Products company donated vinegar for further studies. Diabetes research has also been supported by donations from the Almond Board of California.

[3]
The Susan N. Coleman Scholarship in Nutrition supports students committed to volunteer work in the field of nutrition. Recipient Baylee Evans, a dietetics undergraduate in the nutrition school, assists veterans at the Southeast Veterans Affairs Clinic.

[4]
Industrial mixers donated by Utah-based Blendtec allow Kent Moody, chef in the Nutritional Instructional Kitchen, to teach healthy cooking skills using freshly grown produce from the ASU kitchen gardens and to integrate those recipes into menus.

[5]
Tempe Sports Authority Foundation President Michael Myrick helps oversee scholarships that recognize the character and courage of those who overcome challenges in life. Its 2015 Tom Burns Memorial Scholarship was awarded to Katelyn Anderson, a junior in the nutrition program.

[6]
The Lloyd S. Hubbard Nutrition Research Fund supported the work of Christy Lespron during her graduate studies and as a clinical assistant professor in the nutrition program. Currently the president of the Arizona Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, Lespron researches foods that help people manage their blood-glucose levels.

[7]
A breath hydrogen machine donated by the Bragg Company enables honors student Noel Ugarte to study colonic fermentation, a biological process that may improve colonic function.

Find out how you can support nutrition education in Arizona at chs.asu.edu/about/invest

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